Tag Archives: hannes andersson

To Be Frank @ Westwerk Hamburg

Documentation from the exhibition in Hamburg with Hannes Andersson, Salim Bayri, Jip de Beer, Luca Grimaldi and Klaas Jonkman, curated by Wim Bosch and with an opening performance by Michiel Westbeek.


Absence Of Paths

Today launched the “The Absence Of Paths”- The Tunisian national pavilion for this year’s Venice Biennale- which I am happy and proud to contribute to, as it brings the much needed discussion concerning bordering and freedom of movement into the highly nationalised context of the biennale.
Check it out!
http://www.theabsenceofpaths.com/

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Emergence~

Emergence~ is an audio-visual work by Hannes Andersson about vibrancy, resonance, communication and the emergent qualities that arises through interaction. It is a sensory experience situated slightly above the flicker fusion threshold, on the fluctuating border between the clear and the abstract.
My hope is that it provides enough direction for communication to take place, while at the same time leaving enough lee-room for the viewer to fill with his/her own thoughts and feelings.
The work is also an experiment in the combining of neurological triggers (such as rapid flickering and high/low frequency sounds in varying vibrational patterns) with symbolic narrative elements.

3D animation, modeling and compositing has been made in Cinema 4D R16, with the exception of the 3D scans which was captured with the Skanect software using a Microsoft Kinect sensor. The sound design, synthesis and edit have been using Ableton Live 9 in combination with Max 7. 2D animation, Textures, image post-production and final edit has been made using Adobe After Effects.

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videowork in progress (“Your mouth is like the feet of the octopus she said”)

Back from New York and back at work with some new inspiration (as well as body, time, rhythm fucked-up-ness).
Here are some (more) screenshots from the video piece I am currently working on (titled: “Your mouth is like the feet of the octopus she said”),
These specific renders are heavily inspired conceptually by Carlos Castaneda (not sure which book but at one point he meets the moth gate keeper and battle him fearing for his life (as he always kindof does) to gain access to another part of his dreamworld. It is also aesthetically heavily influenced by Hieronymus Bosch (“The temptation of st Anthony”).

Everything comes together eventually it seems…screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-21-33-42 screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-22-46-35 screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-22-47-20 screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-22-47-42 screen-shot-2016-11-05-at-08-33-27

theBook (ongoingProgress)

 

The book is made with the purpose of documenting my work and making implicit my thinking as well as artistic process. It is version 0.2 of a book that might never be finished, as it –much like the process that it documents – will be subject to constant revision.
It also serves as a conceptualizing framework for what I refer to as Po[e]litics, and for the artistic research project ‘Po[e]litics from the Anthropocene’. Po[e]litics can be thought of as a Portable Philosophy Format, a .ppf with variable compression.
Po[e]litics sometimes takes the form of annotated poetry (illustrated for example in ‘Oedipus Reaches Maturity’ (below)), but it is not example_annotatedpoetrysolely a concept relating to the written word, but rather an aesthetic container for mixed media hyper-narratives, which can be read in any order as well as on various levels of depth. It is an attempt at constructing a language capable of addressing the complexities of contemporaneity: A trans-medial language appropriate of the anthropocene; A language for the networked human.

The book is available for download/reading here
I make it available like this because I believe strongly in the sharing of information, it is however a work intended to be experienced as a printed book (and it does in fact work much better in that format), so if you would like one drop me an email and I can send you one for the price of the printing cost.

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